Video

polyphonyrocks:

madamescherzo:

Te Deum

Marc-Antoine Charpentier  -  Te Deum

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zemblacascadia:

Yelena Bryksenkova
Proust!
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zemblacascadia:

Stefan Eggeler

(Source: a-dangerous-mind)

Audio

homilius:

Carlo Gesualdo, Mercè, grido piangendo (Madrigali libro quinto, 1611)

Les Arts Florissants • William Christie (1987)

Mercè, grido piangendo,
ma chi m’ascolta?
Ahi lasso, io vengo meno.
Morrò dunque tacendo.
Deh, per pietade! Almeno,
o del mio cor tesoro,
potessi dirti pria
ch’io mora: Io moro.

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"Tartini’s Dream" by Louis-Léopold Boilly (1824)
"One night, in the year 1713 I dreamed I had made a pact with the devil for my soul. Everything went as I wished: my new servant anticipated my every desire. Among other things, I gave him my violin to see if he could play. How great was my astonishment on hearing a sonata so wonderful and so beautiful, played with such great art and intelligence, as I had never even conceived in my boldest flights of fantasy. I felt enraptured, transported, enchanted: my breath failed me, and - I awoke. I immediately grasped my violin in order to retain, in part at least, the impression of my dream. In vain! The music which I at this time composed is indeed the best that I ever wrote, and I still call it the "Devil’s Trill", but the difference between it and that which so moved me is so great that I would have destroyed my instrument and have said farewell to music forever if it had been possible for me to live without the enjoyment it affords me."

"Tartini’s Dream" by Louis-Léopold Boilly (1824)

"One night, in the year 1713 I dreamed I had made a pact with the devil for my soul. Everything went as I wished: my new servant anticipated my every desire. Among other things, I gave him my violin to see if he could play. How great was my astonishment on hearing a sonata so wonderful and so beautiful, played with such great art and intelligence, as I had never even conceived in my boldest flights of fantasy. I felt enraptured, transported, enchanted: my breath failed me, and - I awoke. I immediately grasped my violin in order to retain, in part at least, the impression of my dream. In vain! The music which I at this time composed is indeed the best that I ever wrote, and I still call it the "Devil’s Trill", but the difference between it and that which so moved me is so great that I would have destroyed my instrument and have said farewell to music forever if it had been possible for me to live without the enjoyment it affords me."

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Franz Kafka and Felice Bauer.

I’m currently reading Kafka’s letters to Felice

so I found this nice picture here  http://www.flickriver.com/photos/charlespieperpuppets/6873825014/

Tags: kafka
Video

polyphonyrocks:

leadingtone:

Monteverdi
Lamento della Ninfa,
from Madrigali guererri e amorosi (VIII Libro)

Emma Kirkby, Paul Agnew, Andrew King, Alan Ewing

The Consort of Musicke
Anthony Rooley

Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi (1567 - 1643) was an Italian composer, gambist, singer, and Roman Catholic priest.  His work, often regarded as revolutionary, marked the transition from the Renaissance style of music to that of the Baroque period.  He developed two individual styles of composition: the heritage of Renaissance polyphony and the new basso continuo technique of the Baroque.  Monteverdi wrote one of the earliest operas, L’Orfeo, an innovative work that is still regularly performed.